Welcome to the Border Country!

...A spectacular autumnal view of the Cheviots at Langleeford, near Wooler, Northumberland.

Ancient Forts and Camps

...from the Iron Age to the Dark Ages.

Ruined Farms

...and Abandoned Settlements.

Bronze Age Cairns

...and Prehistoric Trade.

Which path will you follow?

...The Featherwood to Chew Green stretch of Dere Street.

Explore the old tracks through the Cheviots
...and walk through history!

Less than an hour from Newcastle, and little more than that from Edinburgh, the Cheviot Hills straddle the border between England and Scotland – a wild and beautiful setting of rounded hills and valleys.

Hills and mountains are sometimes seen as barriers – but not here. Old tracks and highways thread their way through the landscape, running along the ridges, over the tops and dipping down into the valleys that reach deep into the Cheviots.

As you walk along these tracks – if you know what to look for – you become aware you are walking through history. From the Bronze Age to the 21st century, humans have left their mark here.

This web site will help you to make sense of all this
– to explore key routes, help find places along them and explain what they are – or were.

The Cheviots

The Cheviots
The beautiful and dramatic range of hills that define the Border country. This chapter allows you to explore the unique topography, history, geology and wildlife of the Cheviots...

The Roads

The Roads
This chapter guides you along five of the most important roads, giving a general overview, history, the 'modern' routeway, along with detailed interactive maps and resources...

Archaeological Features

Archaeological Features
An extraordinary number of archaeological sites can be explored along the Border Roads. This chapter catalogues the sites, presenting detailed descriptions and rich photography...

Recommended Walks

Recommended Walks
Find out which routes are best for you! Detailed maps, instructions, lists of features etc., can all be found in here...

About us

About us
Information and acknowledgements from the dedicated Border Roads Project Team, the Archaeological Practice Ltd., and Coquetdale Community Archaeology...
This site was built as part of a project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Northumberland National Park